Neutering

Northvet recommend neutering all animals which are not going to be used for breeding.

Points to think about before breeding :
- Is your pet suitable? Some dogs need to be hip scored and eye tested.
- Is there a suitable mate available who has had all the relevant health tests.
- Do you have time for a pregnant animal and the subsequent litter.
- Are you prepared if things don't go according to plan. Not
all pregnancies and births are straightforward.
-Are you going to be able to find suitable homes for the
whole litter and would you be prepared to take a puppy or
kitten back if things don't work out in their new home.

If you do decide to breed we still recommend neutering afterwards.

Did you know.... if left un-neutered a female cat could be responsible for 20,000 descendants in just 5 years!!

 

What does the operation consist of?

In a female animal "speying" consists of removing the ovaries and uterus, an ovariohysterectomy. In male animals the testicles are removed, known as "castration". The operation is done under a general anaesthetic so your pet will
need to be starved from around 8.00pm the night before. They need to be dropped off at the surgery between 8.30am- 9.30am and we will ask you to sign a consent form for anaesthetic and surgical procedures. Your pet will have a health check prior to being anaesthetised and will be monitored constantly throughout their stay with us. The procedure is usually very straightforward and your pet can go home the same day. They will receive antibiotics and painkiller by injection.
You will be given a discharge form when you collect your pet detailing the procedures we have done and giving you all the post-operative instructions. If you have any queries or are worried about your pet you can ring us anytime for
help and advice.

 

What problems can I expect from an un-neutered animal?

MALE DOGS
Dogs can smell a bitch in season from 5 miles away. Unable to resist temptation they
may run away and cause road accidents or get into fights. If he can't get away, an
amorous dog may turn his attention to furniture or even people. Barking and
aggression are also signs of frustration.

FEMALE DOGS (BITCHES)
Bitches come into season every 6 months. This can be messy and cause
' temperament changes. You could end up with visiting dogs and a bitch doing her best
to escape, leading to unwanted pregnancy.

MALE CATS (TOMS)
There's no getting away from it- entire tom cats SMELL!! They spray mark their
territory with urine and if they do it in the house the smell can be difficult to remove. Tom
cats are great wanderers. They may cause accidents and often get into fights with
other cats. leading to infected wounds, abscesses and the spread of serious diseases.

FEMALE CATS (QUEENS)
As with bitches. a queen in season will attract a continual host of admirers. Romantic
cat calls in the night are difficult to sleep through and inevitably lead to pregnancy.

 

What are the health benefits of neutering my pet?

MALE DOGS
Entire male dogs can suffer from testicular tumours. prostate problems and perineal hernias. These conditions are under the control of testosterone so neutering will prevent them from happening. Neutering also reduces aggression and sexual frustration which can actually cause illness.

BITCHES
Speying greatly reduces the incidence of mammary tumours in later life. The earlier you spey her (before her first season) the lesser the chance of tumours developing. It also eliminates a condition called "pyometra" which is where the uterus becomes infected and need to be removed. This is a very serious and potentially life-threatening condition.
Speying also eliminates false pregnancy which can cause physical and behavioural changes that may require veterinary attention.

TOMCATS
Done early enough. neutering reduces the tendency to scent mark territory. It will keep you cat closer to home. lessening the risk of accidents. fights and the spread of disease.

QUEENS
Female cats are also at risk of developing mammary tumours and pyometra.

90% of mammary tumours in cats are malignant.

 

Other FAQ's

When can I neuter my pet?
Cats can be done anytime from 6 months of age, as can male dogs. Bitches can also
be done from 6 months of age but if they have had a season you need to wait for 3
months after this is finished.

An old wives tale ...
Bitches and queens do not need to have had a season before they are neutered .
Health benefits are actually greater the earlier they are done.

Will it make my pet fat?
NO!! Animals only get fat from over eating. However, neutered animals need fewer
calories and you should keep an eye on your pet's weight following the operation. You
can bring your pet in to the surgery for regular weight checks and one of our nurses will
be happy to discuss their diet with you.

Will it change my pet's personality?
In female animals there will be virtually no change. If there are any changes in male
animals these will be only for the better as your pet will become less aggressive and
sexaully driven.

www.orkneyferals.co.uk

www.cats.org.uk/orkney

www.dogaidsociety.com

 

Tessa Gets Speyed


Tessa is a 6 month old Cavalier King Charles Spaniel

Tessa arrives at the surgery at 9.00am having been starved overnight. 

We weigh her so we can calculate an accurate dose of anaesthetic to give her. She gets a pre-anaesthetic check where we record her heart rate. breathing rate and capillary refill time.

She then receives her sedative. which includes a painkiller, and is left quietly for 15-20 minutes for this to take effect.

   

Once the sedative has taken effect, Tessa. receives her anaesthetic into a vein in her front leg.

 

Tessa is connected to the gaseous anaesthetic machine by a tube which goes down her windpipe.

 

The operation site is shaved in preparation for surgery.

 

Tessa is then moved through to the operating theatre where the op site is cleaned with special surgical scrub. During this time the vet prepares her instruments and scrubs up.

 

Blue sterile drapes are used on the operation site and for setting the instruments on.

Tessa's heart rate and breathing are monitored constantly throughout the operation.

   

Tessa receives long acting antibiotic by injection. Once the operation is complete. she is taken off the anaesthetic machine. her endotracheal tube is removed and she is taken through to the recovery kennels. She gradually comes round from her anaesthetic and is soon awake enough to go home.